Fraudulent transfers of assets to defraud creditors is a major “no-no.” Proceed with great caution.

Debtors that anticipate being subject to a judgment might fraudulently transfer their assets in an attempt to hide those assets from their creditors. This issue might even exist after the creditor obtains a judgment against the debtor. Just because a debtor might do this, does not mean that creditors are out of luck. 

Ohio’s Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act, under ORC Chapter 1336, creates rights for creditors to set aside fraudulent transfers by debtors. The point of these rights is to do away with fraudulent transfers that “prevent a creditor from obtaining satisfaction of an underlying debt.” 

There are four general causes of action under ORC Chapter 1336. A fraudulent transfer, as the one described above, would likely fall under the cause of action provided by ORC Section 1336.04(A)(1). To succeed on such a claim, the creditor must prove that there was a transfer of an asset with actual intent to defraud, hinder, or delay present or future creditors. A creditor may prove “actual intent” through the use of circumstantial evidence. Types of circumstantial evidence, or badges, are listed in ORC Section 1336.04(B). 

If a creditor fraudulently transfers assets, ORC Section 1336.08 generally allows creditors to sue the transferees (i.e., parties that received the fraudulent transfers). The creditor can sue any of the transferees for the value of the transferred property, subject to certain defenses.” That is not to say that a creditor would be required to sue every single transferee. The only “necessary party would be the transferee (or participant for whose benefit the transaction was made) from whom recovery is sought.” The statute is written as such because in most fraudulent transfer cases, “the debtor is judgment-proof and the transfer was made to hide the property from the creditor.” 

ORC Section 1336.07 addresses creditor remedies, which include:

  1. an avoidance of the transfer; 
  2. an attachment or garnishment against the asset transferred or other property of the debtor;
  3. an injunction against further disposition of the asset transferred or other property of the debtor;
  4. an appointment of a receiver to take charge of the asset transferred; or
  5. any other relief that the circumstances of the case may require.”

Punitive damages may also be awarded. However, ORC Section 2315.21(C) states that punitive damages are not recoverable unless: 

  1. the actions or omissions of that debtor demonstrate malice or aggravated or egregious fraud, and 
  2. the trier of fact has made a determination of the total compensatory damages recoverable by the creditor from that debtor.

Attorneys’ fees may also be awarded. However, there is not an automatic award of attorney fees for those who prevail under ORC Section 1336. The creditor “may only recover reasonable attorney fees” when punitive damages are awarded.

So, if you are a creditor chasing a debtor who is actively fraudulently transferring assets to hide them from you, it might be time to call an attorney with the Finney Law Firm. 

Contact Jennings Kleeman at 513.797.2858 for assistance with a fraudulent transfer claim.

Attorney | 513-943-6650 | jennings@finneylawfirm.com | + posts

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